Tag Archives: roger goodell

Goodell Watch | 2017 NFL season football ratings are down

The trend is clear: NFL TV numbers are declining. One big-dollar sponsor, the Papa John’s pizza chain, is pointing a finger at commissioner Roger Goodell for his seeming inaction on player protests.

Source: www.sportingnews.com

Averages for NFL games this season have attracted 14.8 million viewers, compared to 15.6 million for 2016.  Hmm.  Might want to squash this soon Roger.  Your time is almost up.  Either way it looks like Pizza Hut and Papa Johns have started to use this to their advantage.  Can you say pizza war!

Roger Goodell tried stopping NFL players from making ‘Ballers’ cameos

In an interview with ESPN’s show Mike & Mike, Mark Wahlberg revealed that NFL commissioner Roger Goodell tried to stop players from appearing on the HBO show Ballers, of which Wahlberg is an executive producer. Ballers follows a retired former football star played by Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, and has featured many current NFL stars, such as DeSean Jackson, Antonio Brown, and Steven Jackson, among others.

when does hbo ballers start

While lots of players have been interested in appearing on the show in its second season (which debuts this coming Sunday), Wahlberg said that at first it was difficult to get them involved. He said the only people calling were “guys like Roger Goodell, saying, ‘you can’t do this,’ and various owners in the league.”
ballers trees

Wahlberg insisted it would be good for the league, and now, it appears as though the naysayers have changed their tunes.

the rock hbo show ballers, ballers season 2

The players should be able to go on the show if they choose.  Roger Goodell has been a stain on the NFL since he was appointed Commissioner so he needs to let this go and enjoy his Tom Brady suspension.  Hell, maybe Wahlberg should ask Tom Brady to make a cameo just to piss Goodell off.  Don’t forget, “Ballers” Season 2 starts tomorrow!

James Harrison Considering Legal Action vs. NFL After Deflategate Ruling

The NFL Players Association’s successful appeal of Tom Brady’s Deflategate suspension has opened the floodgates for current players who have bones to pick with the league. According toBill Phillips of WPXI in Pittsburgh, Steelers linebacker James Harrison is mulling a lawsuit against the NFL.

Steelers, pittsburgh steelers, james harrison, deflategate, tom brady, roger goodell
“I’m just wondering how far they can go with it with the other guys that he suspended or fined at his discretion,” Harrison said.

“I’m just wondering how far they can go with it with the other guys that he suspended or fined at his discretion,” Harrison said. “Hopefully there will be other guys that fight this and be able to fight them.”

This comes after U.S. District Court Judge Richard Berman threw outthe four-game ban the league levied against Brady for his suspected role in the Deflategate affair.

As ProFootballTalk’s Josh Alper noted, Berman took particular exception to Commissioner Roger Goodell’s role as judge, jury and executioner and his penchant for uneven punishments for players:

While discussing reasons why a judge could overturn an arbitrator’s award under a collective bargaining agreement, Berman notes that an arbitrator “is not free to merely dispense his own brand of industrial justice.” He also notes that the “law of the shop” in the NFL is for players to be made aware of prohibited conduct and potential discipline, something that Berman finds the NFL did not do in regard to Brady.

According to Phillips, Harrison is planning on talking with the NFLPA as to whether he has legal grounds for a lawsuit against Goodell and the NFL, similar to Brady’s Deflategate suit.

Harrison has taken issue with fines Goodell has imposed on him in the past for so-called “dirty” hits. Here’s a snippet from an interview between Harrison and Paul Solotaroff in the August 2011 issue ofMen’s Journal in which the veteran linebacker explained his strong dislike for the commissioner:

When Harrison was summoned to league headquarters in November to meet with Goodell, NFL executive vice president Ray Anderson, and director of football operations Merton Hanks, he was made to watch a reel of his questionable hits plucked from four years as a starter. “They take 10 plays out of 4,000 snaps and want to know my thought process on each,” he says. “What I tried to explain to Goodell, but he was too stupid to understand, is that dudes crouch when you go to hit them. With Massaquoi, my target area was his waist and chest, but he lowered himself at the last possible second and I couldn’t adjust to his adjustment. But Goodell, who’s a devil, ain’t hearing that. Where’s the damn discretion, the common sense?”

With Judge Berman calling Goodell’s authority into question, you can understand why Harrison would want to explore whether he can receive monetary restitution for what may have been unfair fines.

The 37-year-old isn’t the first player after Brady to consider the idea. ProFootballTalk’s Mike Florio reported in August that Dallas Cowboysdefensive end Greg Hardy was thinking of following in Brady’s footsteps and appealing his four-game suspension to start the 2015 season.

If Hardy or Harrison takes legal action against Goodell, it could embolden others to as well. And should that happen, Goodell’s position as commissioner may become untenable.

 

From the Bleacher Report

NFL in Damage-Control Mode Over Head-Trauma Movie ‘CONCUSSION’

Will Smith’s ‘Concussion’ Drama: NFL Plots Embrace-the-Debate Strategy

Concussion Trailer Still - H 2015
Courtesy of Sony Pictures
Sony’s ‘Concussion’

The league says it would even entertain the prospect of working with Sony on raising awareness about football safety.

Facing an onslaught of potentially damaging PR, the National Football League has drafted its own game plan for dealing with the upcoming Sony film Concussion.

The league will host a series of discussions, conferences and scientific strategy meetings about player safety over the coming months in the run-up to Concussion’s release Christmas Day. In fact, the NFL says it welcomes the Will Smith-led film’s ability to spark dialogue on the subject, despite being portrayed as an organization that tried to conceal findings about the long-term effects of football-related head trauma.

“When something like this movie comes up and people want to talk about concussions or football or the future of the sport, that’s an opportunity for us to engage,” Jeff Miller, NFL senior vp health and safety policy, toldThe Hollywood Reporter. “We intend to do just that over the course of the movie and long after that.”

Among the events planned are a convening of concussion experts at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center that is being funded by a grant from the NFL Foundation (beginning Oct. 15) and the International Professional Sports Concussion Research Think Tank in London (Oct. 23-25).

The NFL isn’t shirking from the media glare in the wake of Monday’s Concussion trailer debut, which prompted major news coverage from networks and national outlets. Miller says the NFL will speak to any press outlet that wants to know about the health and safety questions in football and what the league is doing to reduce concussions. Perhaps more intriguing, the NFL would even entertain the prospect of working with Sony on raising awareness.

 

“The studio hasn’t asked,” Miller added. “And if they were to and it gives us the opportunity to talk about the health and safety of our sport, we would do that. But there hasn’t been any communication to this point.”

Sony declined comment.

To date, no one from the NFL has been invited to see the film, which has been screened mostly for sports journalists, including writers and editors at Sports Illustrated, which made the film its cover story this week.

Meanwhile Sony is scrambling in the aftermath of a New York Times article — citing a series of hacked emails — that claims the studio softened the film’s take on the NFL. In response, the studio has put the film’s directorPeter Landesman on the record for a number of news outlets including THR[2] in an effort to reverse the perception that it caved to pressure. The NFL, too, is bristling at the suggestion that it applied any pressure to alter the film. THR could find no evidence in the trove of leaked emails from last year that the studio and the NFL had any contact regarding Concussion beyond a brief email exchange between Landesman and NFL communications chief Paul Hicks in which the director requested a meeting that never materialized (Hicks asked for and was denied a copy of the script).

“It’s probably something that we, the league, need to do a better job of in terms of talking about the things we do [to educate] as well as continuing to do the things we do to improve the [safety of the] game,” Miller added. “If this [movie] presents an opportunity to engage in that conversation, then that’s terrific for us.”

And while Sony and the NFL are waging their own PR campaigns over the film’s treatment of the league, Dr. Christopher Giza, director of UCLA’s Steve Tisch BrainSPORT Program, offered up an outside perspective on the Concussion debate.

“One concern I have is that the film might paint too dire a picture of a post-concussion prognosis,” Dr. Giza said. “People who have suffered concussions need — and should have — hope because there’s a lot that can be done, and we are learning more every day.”

From the Hollywood Reporter