Tag Archives: nfl standings

Why Does McDonald’s Hate the Minnesota Vikings?

First, the burger chain screwed up head coach Mike Zimmer’s order – then they sent a shipment of Packers cups to Minnesota by accident

Source: www.rollingstone.com

“I went to McDonald’s on the way home because I was hungry, and I ordered two cheeseburgers,” Zimmer said. “I only got one. That’s the kind of week it’s been.”

Johnny Manziel lied to team about video that surfaced last weekend, asked friend to lie

CLEVELAND – Johnny Manziel lied to the Browns after a video surfaced of him partying at a club, FOXSports NFL Insider Jay Glazer reports.

The warning signs were there from the beginning.  A lot of NFL experts believed that while Johnny Manziel had enough talent to succeed as a pro, there were plenty of red flags to insist he lacked the maturity.  He was too young, too impulsive and too in love with the college party life to take on the responsibility of leading men to battle on Sundays.  Never has that been more clear than with the most recent incident.

A video surfaced of the second-year quarterback partying during the Cleveland Browns bye week.  This apparently after the team expressed the desire that he hang around the team facility and lay low for once.  The fact alone that he ignored them was a bad sign, but more information has come to light that really puts his benching and his likely dismissal from the team down the road into perspective.

“As if Browns quarterback Johnny Manziel hadn’t already given the team more than enough reasons to never trust him again, here’s another. According to Jay Glazer of FOX Sports, Manziel lied to the Browns about the circumstances surrounding the photos that surfaced following his bye-week excursion to Texas.

Per Glazer, Manziel not only told the team that the photos weren’t taken over the weekend but also recruited others to vouch for the falsehood.”

That doesn’t just signal the fact that Manziel has his priorities in the wrong place, it shows he lacks a degree of honesty that great quarterbacks need to get teammates and coaches to trust him.  For all the good things he did in college, it’s apparent he probably left before he learned the final ingredient to being a winner:  responsibility.

Hard as it is to admit, NFL teams don’t like players that show intent to deceiver for their own selfish gains.  Johnny Manziel already had enough doubts before he even took a snap in Cleveland.  With the growing list of problems he’s caused since making the jump last year, he’ll have a stigma around him that is almost impossible to erase.

Thing is, it’s his own fault.

From NFLMocks.com

 

Here’s why an NFL player is suing FanDuel, Ironically

pierre garcon, redskins, washington redskins, fanduel, fantasy football, nfl, draft kings
Washington Redskins wide receiver Pierre Garcon looks on late in the fourth quarter in a game between the Redskins and New York Giants at MetLife Stadium on December 14, 2014 in East Rutherford, NJ. Photograph by Ricky Carioti — The Washington Post/Getty Images

It’s not about gambling.

Amidst ongoing scrutiny of daily fantasy sports companies, Washington Redskins wide receiver Pierre Garçon, through his attorney, filed a class action lawsuit against FanDuel on Friday.

There has been a slew of class action lawsuits brought against FanDuel and its competitor DraftKings in the past few weeks, but they have been brought by users of the companies alleging unfair play by insiders. The lawsuits came in the wake of a major scandal over a DraftKings employee who won $250,000 playing on FanDuel.

But Garçon’s lawsuit is different. It’s not about insider play, nor is it concerned with whether daily fantasy sports is gambling, which has been the focus of recent regulatory scrutiny. It’s about player permission, and whether FanDuel illegally uses player names and likenesses. He has filed it “on behalf” of all NFL players, but for now the suit is coming only from Garçon.

According to a statement released by Garçon’s lawyers, the receiver argues that FanDuel, “knowingly and improperly exploits the popularity and performance of Garçon, along with all the other National Football League (“NFL”) players at offensive skilled positions without their authority or a valid license.”

The complaint also addresses FanDuel’s advertising: “Through a comprehensive television advertising campaign… FanDuel routinely uses the names and likenesses of some of these NFL players without authorization to promote FanDuel’s commercial enterprise.”

In other words, the lawsuit addresses two different realms: the product itself (FanDuel’s website and app, where it uses player names and a small photo of each) and the company’s ads. To the former complaint, there is some legal precedent that favors FanDuel, though it was in a different sport: in 2006 a federal judge ruled that fantasy sports leagues can use the names and likenesses of MLB players. The latter may be the stronger argument for Garçon: Last month, DraftKings scored a deal with the NFL Players’ Association that allows the company to use any NFL players in its advertisements with or without the player’s individual permission; this is why DraftKings isn’t part of Garçon’s lawsuit.

FanDuel has no such deal. It has not used Garçon’s face in its advertisements (in fact FanDuel has sought to differentiate its advertising from DraftKings by utilizing regular people, not celebrity spokespeople), but it has shown screens with his name listed among other players.

“I am bringing this lawsuit against FanDuel for using my name, image, and likeness in both daily fantasy contests and through advertising on TV ads and infomercials,” Garçon said in a statement. But as Twitter users were quick to point out on Friday, the suit represents a change of heart by the receiver, who repeatedly shilled for FanDuel in the past, up until one year ago.

It’s not about gambling.

Amidst ongoing scrutiny of daily fantasy sports companies, Washington Redskins wide receiver Pierre Garçon, through his attorney, filed a class action lawsuit against FanDuel on Friday.

There has been a slew of class action lawsuits brought against FanDuel and its competitor DraftKings in the past few weeks, but they have been brought by users of the companies alleging unfair play by insiders. The lawsuits came in the wake of a major scandal over a DraftKings employee who won $250,000 playing on FanDuel.

But Garçon’s lawsuit is different. It’s not about insider play, nor is it concerned with whether daily fantasy sports is gambling, which has been the focus of recent regulatory scrutiny. It’s about player permission, and whether FanDuel illegally uses player names and likenesses. He has filed it “on behalf” of all NFL players, but for now the suit is coming only from Garçon.

According to a statement released by Garçon’s lawyers, the receiver argues that FanDuel, “knowingly and improperly exploits the popularity and performance of Garçon, along with all the other National Football League (“NFL”) players at offensive skilled positions without their authority or a valid license.”

The complaint also addresses FanDuel’s advertising: “Through a comprehensive television advertising campaign… FanDuel routinely uses the names and likenesses of some of these NFL players without authorization to promote FanDuel’s commercial enterprise.”

In other words, the lawsuit addresses two different realms: the product itself (FanDuel’s website and app, where it uses player names and a small photo of each) and the company’s ads. To the former complaint, there is some legal precedent that favors FanDuel, though it was in a different sport: in 2006 a federal judge ruled that fantasy sports leagues can use the names and likenesses of MLB players. The latter may be the stronger argument for Garçon: Last month, DraftKings scored a deal with the NFL Players’ Association that allows the company to use any NFL players in its advertisements with or without the player’s individual permission; this is why DraftKings isn’t part of Garçon’s lawsuit.

FanDuel has no such deal. It has not used Garçon’s face in its advertisements (in fact FanDuel has sought to differentiate its advertising from DraftKings by utilizing regular people, not celebrity spokespeople), but it has shown screens with his name listed among other players.

“I am bringing this lawsuit against FanDuel for using my name, image, and likeness in both daily fantasy contests and through advertising on TV ads and infomercials,” Garçon said in a statement. But as Twitter users were quick to point out on Friday, the suit represents a change of heart by the receiver, who repeatedly shilled for FanDuel in the past, up until one year ago.

This lawsuit has a lot in common with UCLA basketball alum Ed O’Bannon’s much-publicized class action lawsuit against the NCAA over compensation for college athletes. When O’Bannon first filed in 2009, his claim named EA Games as a co-defendant, for using player likenesses without consent. He was successful in that part of his suit; in 2014 the video game company settled for $40 million.

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The Cowboys’ Greg Hardy Experiment Has Gone Awry

After Hardy shoved a coach in Sunday’s loss to the Giants, Jerry Jones backed the embattled defensive end and the locker room tried to ignore the ugly truth: Big D now stands for Dysfunction

Dallas Cowboys defensive end Greg Hardy.
As a refresher, Hardy was convicted last July of assaulting and threatening to kill his former girlfriend. Hardy dragged her by the hair from room to room, threw her on a futon covered in rifles and clasped his hands around her neck. Those are the details that Hardy’s first wave of enablers, those blind to his conviction, tend to forget or at least compartmentalize. They point to Hardy’s appeal for a jury trial, automatically granted in North Carolina, and claim that because Hardy’s ex-girlfriend failed to show that makes Hardy innocent. It does not.Fast-forward to this season, in which Hardy, gifted an $11.3 million contact by Jerry Jones who clearly believes in talent over trouble, has perfected his bad boy role to a T. And no one with any authority seems to give a damn.

The last player out of the shower in the visitors’ locker room was Greg Hardy, red-eyed and indignant a good 45 minutes after the Cowboys’ 27-20 loss to the Giants.

Still dripping wet in front of his locker, the combustible defensive end turned to face a group of reporters and proceeded to cut off every question with the same sharp, dismissive response: “No comment. Next question.” There was a brief pause after six such exchanges, and that was his cue to end the interview with the most insincere of salutations.

“Thank you guys for coming,” Hardy said. “I appreciate you all very much.”

This is the player who moments earlier had been described by owner Jerry Jones as “one of the real leaders on the team,” which hardly makes any sense. Is a real leader someone who misses the first four games, having been suspended by the NFL for a domestic violence incident in which he assaulted his ex-girlfriend and threw her on a futon covered with semi-automatic rifles? Is a real leader someone who inserts himself into the special-teams huddle on the field, yelling and pushing around coaches and teammates after the Giants score a 100-yard touchdown on a kickoff?

“That’s the kind of thing that inspires a football team,” Jones said of Hardy’s outburst, though it never had that effect. Hardy’s antics continued on the sideline, where he got into a heated exchange with injured receiver Dez Bryant. A few minutes later, the special-teams unit committed another miscue, muffing a punt that sealed the win for the Giants. Jones later admitted that he hadn’t actually seen Hardy’s fit.

This sequence of events pretty much sums up where the 2015 Cowboys are at after seven weeks: They’ve lost control of their season, and with two of their biggest leaders sidelined by injuries, no one seems to have any answers.

Given his history of violence, and his arrogance for appearing in a recent rap video with strippers and talking about having “guns blazing” in his return to the football field, Hardy has no reservoir of goodwill. One video of Sunday’s on-field scuffle appears to show Hardy aggressively slapping at the clipboard in special-teams coordinator Rich Bisaccia’s hand, prompting the coach to push back and a scuffle to ensue.

Hardy got in the coach’s face, and then had to be steered to the sideline by teammates. Acceptable behavior? The makeup of a leader?

Safety Danny McCray, who was in the special-teams huddle, hesitated before answering.

“Uh, I guess we’ll have to figure that out on Wednesday,” he said. “See what Coach Rich says about it.”

Trying to hold their season together, the Cowboys can’t bear any more questions.

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