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#BillyManziel has gone viral

According to ESPN, Cleveland Browns quarterback Johnny Manziel was seen wearing a unique disguise at a Las Vegas nightclub.

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Sources saw Manziel sporting an odd outfit — a blond wig, a fake mustache, glasses and a hoodie. And he introduced himself as “Billy.”

After being placed in the NFL Concussion Protocol last Wednesday, it was reported by multiple outlets throughout the weekend that Manziel was seen at a Las Vegas casino rather than being at home resting and rehabilitating from the concussion he reportedly suffered in a 17-13 loss to the Kansas City Chiefs on Dec. 27.

You can’t make this stuff up! I can only imagine the shit he is going to get from his teammates if and when he returns to the Cleveland Browns locker room. The Browns recently fired Mike Pettine, what does it take to fire Johnny Football? I mean #BillyManziel!

Why Does McDonald’s Hate the Minnesota Vikings?

First, the burger chain screwed up head coach Mike Zimmer’s order – then they sent a shipment of Packers cups to Minnesota by accident

Source: www.rollingstone.com

“I went to McDonald’s on the way home because I was hungry, and I ordered two cheeseburgers,” Zimmer said. “I only got one. That’s the kind of week it’s been.”

Here’s why an NFL player is suing FanDuel, Ironically

pierre garcon, redskins, washington redskins, fanduel, fantasy football, nfl, draft kings
Washington Redskins wide receiver Pierre Garcon looks on late in the fourth quarter in a game between the Redskins and New York Giants at MetLife Stadium on December 14, 2014 in East Rutherford, NJ. Photograph by Ricky Carioti — The Washington Post/Getty Images

It’s not about gambling.

Amidst ongoing scrutiny of daily fantasy sports companies, Washington Redskins wide receiver Pierre Garçon, through his attorney, filed a class action lawsuit against FanDuel on Friday.

There has been a slew of class action lawsuits brought against FanDuel and its competitor DraftKings in the past few weeks, but they have been brought by users of the companies alleging unfair play by insiders. The lawsuits came in the wake of a major scandal over a DraftKings employee who won $250,000 playing on FanDuel.

But Garçon’s lawsuit is different. It’s not about insider play, nor is it concerned with whether daily fantasy sports is gambling, which has been the focus of recent regulatory scrutiny. It’s about player permission, and whether FanDuel illegally uses player names and likenesses. He has filed it “on behalf” of all NFL players, but for now the suit is coming only from Garçon.

According to a statement released by Garçon’s lawyers, the receiver argues that FanDuel, “knowingly and improperly exploits the popularity and performance of Garçon, along with all the other National Football League (“NFL”) players at offensive skilled positions without their authority or a valid license.”

The complaint also addresses FanDuel’s advertising: “Through a comprehensive television advertising campaign… FanDuel routinely uses the names and likenesses of some of these NFL players without authorization to promote FanDuel’s commercial enterprise.”

In other words, the lawsuit addresses two different realms: the product itself (FanDuel’s website and app, where it uses player names and a small photo of each) and the company’s ads. To the former complaint, there is some legal precedent that favors FanDuel, though it was in a different sport: in 2006 a federal judge ruled that fantasy sports leagues can use the names and likenesses of MLB players. The latter may be the stronger argument for Garçon: Last month, DraftKings scored a deal with the NFL Players’ Association that allows the company to use any NFL players in its advertisements with or without the player’s individual permission; this is why DraftKings isn’t part of Garçon’s lawsuit.

FanDuel has no such deal. It has not used Garçon’s face in its advertisements (in fact FanDuel has sought to differentiate its advertising from DraftKings by utilizing regular people, not celebrity spokespeople), but it has shown screens with his name listed among other players.

“I am bringing this lawsuit against FanDuel for using my name, image, and likeness in both daily fantasy contests and through advertising on TV ads and infomercials,” Garçon said in a statement. But as Twitter users were quick to point out on Friday, the suit represents a change of heart by the receiver, who repeatedly shilled for FanDuel in the past, up until one year ago.

It’s not about gambling.

Amidst ongoing scrutiny of daily fantasy sports companies, Washington Redskins wide receiver Pierre Garçon, through his attorney, filed a class action lawsuit against FanDuel on Friday.

There has been a slew of class action lawsuits brought against FanDuel and its competitor DraftKings in the past few weeks, but they have been brought by users of the companies alleging unfair play by insiders. The lawsuits came in the wake of a major scandal over a DraftKings employee who won $250,000 playing on FanDuel.

But Garçon’s lawsuit is different. It’s not about insider play, nor is it concerned with whether daily fantasy sports is gambling, which has been the focus of recent regulatory scrutiny. It’s about player permission, and whether FanDuel illegally uses player names and likenesses. He has filed it “on behalf” of all NFL players, but for now the suit is coming only from Garçon.

According to a statement released by Garçon’s lawyers, the receiver argues that FanDuel, “knowingly and improperly exploits the popularity and performance of Garçon, along with all the other National Football League (“NFL”) players at offensive skilled positions without their authority or a valid license.”

The complaint also addresses FanDuel’s advertising: “Through a comprehensive television advertising campaign… FanDuel routinely uses the names and likenesses of some of these NFL players without authorization to promote FanDuel’s commercial enterprise.”

In other words, the lawsuit addresses two different realms: the product itself (FanDuel’s website and app, where it uses player names and a small photo of each) and the company’s ads. To the former complaint, there is some legal precedent that favors FanDuel, though it was in a different sport: in 2006 a federal judge ruled that fantasy sports leagues can use the names and likenesses of MLB players. The latter may be the stronger argument for Garçon: Last month, DraftKings scored a deal with the NFL Players’ Association that allows the company to use any NFL players in its advertisements with or without the player’s individual permission; this is why DraftKings isn’t part of Garçon’s lawsuit.

FanDuel has no such deal. It has not used Garçon’s face in its advertisements (in fact FanDuel has sought to differentiate its advertising from DraftKings by utilizing regular people, not celebrity spokespeople), but it has shown screens with his name listed among other players.

“I am bringing this lawsuit against FanDuel for using my name, image, and likeness in both daily fantasy contests and through advertising on TV ads and infomercials,” Garçon said in a statement. But as Twitter users were quick to point out on Friday, the suit represents a change of heart by the receiver, who repeatedly shilled for FanDuel in the past, up until one year ago.

This lawsuit has a lot in common with UCLA basketball alum Ed O’Bannon’s much-publicized class action lawsuit against the NCAA over compensation for college athletes. When O’Bannon first filed in 2009, his claim named EA Games as a co-defendant, for using player likenesses without consent. He was successful in that part of his suit; in 2014 the video game company settled for $40 million.

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Miami coach’s mandate to be more physical comes with a cost

DAVIE, Fla. (AP) — The Miami Dolphins tussled in a rugby-style scrum when practice began Wednesday, with younger players encircled by veterans and challenged to fight their way out of the pack.

”It was just something I thought up,” interim coach Dan Campbell said.

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          Miami Dolphins Head Coach, Dan Campbell

Since replacing Joe Philbin 2 1/2 weeks ago, Campbell has stressed the need to be more physical and aggressive. His lobbying paid off Sunday with a 38-10 win at Tennessee, which the Dolphins (2-3) trumpet as a turnaround in their season.

But for defensive end Olivier Vernon, the pedal-to-the-metal approach comes with a cost: He said he was fined by the NFL for a late, low hit that injured Titans quarterback Marcus Mariota.

Vernon planned to appeal and declined to say how much he was fined. He hit the rookie quarterback’s left knee and drew criticism from Titans coach Ken Whisenhunt, who said it appeared Vernon was trying to hurt Mariota.

”It was nothing that was intentional,” Vernon said. ”Obviously quarterbacks are defenseless when they’re passing the ball. That’s a given. If that was my intent, I should have gotten fined the max.”

Mariota sprained his MCL but didn’t miss a snap. He finished the game with a brace on his knee.

Vernon apologized after the game to Mariota, who said he didn’t consider the hit malicious. On the play, Vernon drew the first of two penalties he received for roughing the passer.

Campbell didn’t view those infractions as negative repercussions from his mandate to be more aggressive.

”We’re just trying to play football,” he said. ”It’s no different than anybody else.”

And the new head coach offered support for Vernon.

”I just told him I know he’s not a dirty player,” Campbell said. ”He’s trying to get to the quarterback.”

The Dolphins did – they had six sacks after totaling one in the first four games. Cameron Wakehad his first four sacks of the season and was chosen AFC defensive player of the week, while Vernon added his first sack of the year.

Miami also outrushed an opponent for the first time this year, 180-63, and would happily settle for the same thing Sunday against Houston.

Texans nose tackle Vince Wilfork, who has played 20 games against Miami, noted the transformation under Campbell.

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”The Dolphins got back to doing what they do best – running the ball,” Wilfork said. ”Last week everybody got a sneak peek at what they really are. They are a ground-and-pound team. They’re tough. They’re physical. As you can see, their coach got them fired up to play, and they responded. We’re going to get their best.”

Campbell, noting the Dolphins’ history of inconsistency, is doing what he can to ensure Wilfork’s correct. The coach has shortened practices but added more contact.

The scrum at the start of Wednesday’s workout was the latest wrinkle, with flailing arms and elbows making it look like a playground free-for-all.

”It’s fun. They were just messing around with each other,” said Campbell, a former NFL tight end. ”When you have the young guys in the middle and they have to find a way to get outside the circle, it kind of gets everybody fired up a little bit. It just created a little bit of energy.”

Article from Yahoo Sports