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NFL star Benjamin Watson takes on Planned Parenthood

NFL star says ‘whole idea’ of Planned Parenthood is to ‘exterminate blacks’

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  • Benjamin Watson made the remarks in an interview with a pro-life group
  • He justified the comment by suggesting Margaret Sanger was racist
  • Sanger founded what would become Planned Parenthood in October 1916
  • ‘The whole idea… in the past was to exterminate blacks,’ Watson said

Christian NFL player Ben Watson does not hesitate to call out Planned Parenthood’s targeting of minority women and their babies for abortions.

In a recent interview with Turning Point Pregnancy Resource Center in San Diego, the Baltimore Ravens player talked about the racial divide in America and how it factors into the abortion issue.

“… Abortion saddens me period, but it seems to be something that is really pushed on minorities and provided to minorities especially as something that they should do,” Watson said.

He pointed to Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger and her eugenic push to exterminate people she deemed “unfit.” Today, “it’s working,” Watson said.

“We sit here and talk about advancing the black agenda, whatever that means, we talk about our interests, and what’s important to us – like having political power and advancement and all those things – and then we are turning around and we are killing our children,” Watson continued. “And we are buying the lie that it’s our personal decision to make.”

The NFL star said he is sympathetic to the women who are struggling with an unplanned pregnancy. But Watson, a husband and father of five children, said many men are not stepping up to help their children and the women in their lives like they should. He urged men to take responsibility for their actions.

“He need to be there to support her through the physical changes of the pregnancy, and help and provide emotional strength, and do it together,” Watson continued. “As much as he has a role in making the baby in the first place, it needs to take both of them the whole way through.”

Sometimes, Watson said he does have the opportunity to talk with other NFL players about abortion and his pro-life convictions. Just like in almost any career setting, Watson said they talk about many different things, including politics and religion.

“You’ve got guys that consider themselves Conservative and pro-life, and you’ve got guys that consider themselves Liberal and pro-choice, and it kind of goes back and forth,” he said. “What I love is that in most of the situations I have been in, not all of them, but most, even if we sometimes talk abrasively to each other, we still have love for each other.”

Last year, after the Center for Medical Progress began releasing its undercover Planned Parenthood videos, Watson wasn’t shy about speaking up for unborn babies either.


He posted on his Facebook wall:

As horrific as it is, the issue isn’t really the sale of human parts. It’s the legal practice that allows this to even be a possibility. Killing children and simply discarding the leftovers is not any more acceptable than profiting off of them. #PlannedParenthood


Asked if he has faced backlash for his stance, Watson told Turning Point, “I won’t say I’m not afraid, and I will say that I’ve received some flak for some of the things I’ve said … I decided that you know, if the spirit of God has prompted me to say something, I’m going to trust in God and say it.”

I have to give mad respect to Ben Watson.  No matter what your position on Planned Parenthood, it takes some cajones to speak up like he has.  With the digital world we live in now the backlash will be inevitable.

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Panthers defensive end Jared Allen, the NFL’s active sacks leader, announced his retirement Thursday

Panthers defensive end Jared Allen, the NFL’s active sacks leader, announced his retirement Thursday via a video, riding off “into the sunset.”

Source: espn.go.com

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Carolina Panthers defensive end Jared Allen announced his retirement from the NFL on Thursday in an unconventional but appropriate way.

The NFL’s active sacks leader (136) posted a video of himself wearing a black cowboy hat, heavy coat and riding a horse off “into the sunset” even though there was none.

“I just want to say thank you for an amazing 12-year career,” Allen said in the video. “This is the part where I was going to ride off into the sunset, but seeing how there is no sunset, I’m just going to ride off.”

Allen, who was raised on a ranch, then waved to the camera, turned his horse and rode off into a snowy field.

Allen released the following statement through his agent, Ken Harris:

“I want to take this time to thank my family, friends, fans and teammates who have given their continued support throughout my 12 year career. It’s been a great ride for me, and I couldn’t be more grateful for the memories. It is with a great deal of thought and consideration that I have decided that I will not return to football next year.

“I want to thank the Carolina Panthers, Chicago BearsMinnesota Vikings and the Kansas City Chiefs organizations, who provided me with an opportunity to live out my dream and to be a part of their wonderful communities. Thanks for the life long memories.”

Allen played in Super Bowl 50 against the Denver Broncos with a broken right foot suffered in a divisional playoff win against Seattle.

Coach Ron Rivera hinted after the 24-10 loss to the Broncos that Allen might have played his last game.

NFL in Damage-Control Mode Over Head-Trauma Movie ‘CONCUSSION’

Will Smith’s ‘Concussion’ Drama: NFL Plots Embrace-the-Debate Strategy

Concussion Trailer Still - H 2015
Courtesy of Sony Pictures
Sony’s ‘Concussion’

The league says it would even entertain the prospect of working with Sony on raising awareness about football safety.

Facing an onslaught of potentially damaging PR, the National Football League has drafted its own game plan for dealing with the upcoming Sony film Concussion.

The league will host a series of discussions, conferences and scientific strategy meetings about player safety over the coming months in the run-up to Concussion’s release Christmas Day. In fact, the NFL says it welcomes the Will Smith-led film’s ability to spark dialogue on the subject, despite being portrayed as an organization that tried to conceal findings about the long-term effects of football-related head trauma.

“When something like this movie comes up and people want to talk about concussions or football or the future of the sport, that’s an opportunity for us to engage,” Jeff Miller, NFL senior vp health and safety policy, toldThe Hollywood Reporter. “We intend to do just that over the course of the movie and long after that.”

Among the events planned are a convening of concussion experts at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center that is being funded by a grant from the NFL Foundation (beginning Oct. 15) and the International Professional Sports Concussion Research Think Tank in London (Oct. 23-25).

The NFL isn’t shirking from the media glare in the wake of Monday’s Concussion trailer debut, which prompted major news coverage from networks and national outlets. Miller says the NFL will speak to any press outlet that wants to know about the health and safety questions in football and what the league is doing to reduce concussions. Perhaps more intriguing, the NFL would even entertain the prospect of working with Sony on raising awareness.

 

“The studio hasn’t asked,” Miller added. “And if they were to and it gives us the opportunity to talk about the health and safety of our sport, we would do that. But there hasn’t been any communication to this point.”

Sony declined comment.

To date, no one from the NFL has been invited to see the film, which has been screened mostly for sports journalists, including writers and editors at Sports Illustrated, which made the film its cover story this week.

Meanwhile Sony is scrambling in the aftermath of a New York Times article — citing a series of hacked emails — that claims the studio softened the film’s take on the NFL. In response, the studio has put the film’s directorPeter Landesman on the record for a number of news outlets including THR[2] in an effort to reverse the perception that it caved to pressure. The NFL, too, is bristling at the suggestion that it applied any pressure to alter the film. THR could find no evidence in the trove of leaked emails from last year that the studio and the NFL had any contact regarding Concussion beyond a brief email exchange between Landesman and NFL communications chief Paul Hicks in which the director requested a meeting that never materialized (Hicks asked for and was denied a copy of the script).

“It’s probably something that we, the league, need to do a better job of in terms of talking about the things we do [to educate] as well as continuing to do the things we do to improve the [safety of the] game,” Miller added. “If this [movie] presents an opportunity to engage in that conversation, then that’s terrific for us.”

And while Sony and the NFL are waging their own PR campaigns over the film’s treatment of the league, Dr. Christopher Giza, director of UCLA’s Steve Tisch BrainSPORT Program, offered up an outside perspective on the Concussion debate.

“One concern I have is that the film might paint too dire a picture of a post-concussion prognosis,” Dr. Giza said. “People who have suffered concussions need — and should have — hope because there’s a lot that can be done, and we are learning more every day.”

From the Hollywood Reporter

Deflategate: The Plot Thickens!

Since 2010, New England Has the Lowest Fumble Rate in the NFL

deflated football, deflategate pats footballs, nfl football, free fantasy football, DEFLATE GATE, weigh these balls, bill belichick

One of the many questions surrounding “Deflategate”—the controversy that has engulfed the New England Patriots—concerns what advantage an NFL team would gain from using a deflated football. Numerous players have said a softer ball is easier to grip, and a ball that’s easier to grip is harder to drop

New England coach Bill Belichick and quarterback Tom Brady both denied ever purposely using footballs that were inflated below the NFL minimum. But on the basis of the allegations, the Count looked at the fumble rate of the Patriots compared with the rest of the league.

New England has had an uncanny ability to hold on to the football for quite some time. According to data compiled by Warren Sharp of Sharp Football Analysis, the Patriots fumble far less than any other team that plays outdoors, where the elements can make the football harder to handle. Beginning in the 2010 season, Patriots players have fumbled (whether lost or recovered) once every 73 touches from scrimmage, which is 52% better than the league average. The next best team is the Ravens, who have fumbled once every 55 touches.

Additionally, according to Stats, LLC, the six players who have played extensively for the Patriots and other teams in this span all fumbled far less frequently wearing the New England uniform. Including recovered fumbles, Danny Amendola, BenJarvus Green-Ellis, Danny Woodhead, Wes Welker, Brandon LaFell and LeGarrette Blount have lost the ball eight times in 1,482 touches for the Patriots since 2010, or once every 185.3 times. For their other teams, they fumbled 22 times in 1,701 touches (once every 77.3).

 

Of course, Belichick is strict disciplinarian when it comes to holding on the football, frequently benching running backs who dare to put the ball on the ground. But other NFL head coaches aren’t exactly cavalier about the practice.

And it’s not only ball carriers who can potentially benefit. Quarterbacks are frequent fumblers when sacked. But while the average passer fumbles once every 7.3 sacks, Brady’s rate is once every 9.1, an improvement of nearly 25%.

 

Source:  The Wall Street Journal

 

 

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