Category Archives: NFL Opinions

Warning for NFL Rookies

Another sad story about a young NFL player

By JUAN ROQUE   JAN. 5, 2017

The NFL suspended troubled Dallas Cowboys Defensive End Randy Gregory today for a minimum of one year. This recent suspension comes after he sat out 10 games in 2016 for the same reason after serving a 4 game suspension in 2015. Gregory, like troubled Cleveland WR Josh Gordon, has now wasted nearly a full season of NFL experience (and pay) for his bullshit off the field.

Gregory has had a history of problems with Marijuana since he entered the NFL after starring at Nebraska. Considered a high end prospect with a First Round grade on many lists he started his pro career off in the worst of ways; he failed a drug test at the Combine. That failed test assassinated his draft stock and he was drafted 60th Overall in the Second Round by the Cowboys.

The uber talented player with endless potential seems to have an issue with prioritizing his life. He took to the wrong veteran as a rookie hanging with accused and acquitted NFL outcast Greg Hardy and hasn’t done much since arriving in Dallas. What makes this situation all the more tragic is not many have his combination of size, strength and speed. He’s still young and can have a future in football but like Josh Gordon his time is running out. If he doesn’t make changes in his life Gregory will be another cautionary tale told to Rookies about what not to do when becoming a pro.

randy gregory, nfl rookie
Randy Gregory’s violation of the NFL’s policy and program for substances of abuse has resulted in a minimum one-year ban. AP Photo/James D Smith

 


Juan Roque is a former American college and professional football player who was an offensive tackle in the National Football League

 

 

Quick Thoughts: Tony Romo

Tony Romo gave a press conference yesterday about the Dak Prescott situation.


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Kudos to Romo.  It takes a lot to give up a starting position on the NFL, especially at the QB position.  He is admirable for doing so in the public.  Had he not said anything the distraction would have grew as the season progressed.  Dak is playing very well and to be 8-1 in this league is very impressive.  I deal with a similar situation with a veteran starting quarteback and a rookie draft pick who hadn’t played yet.  We lost a game after game and the locker room tension built during this.  Eventually one of our star players had enough and blew up after a loss.  It was chaos and time for a change.  Everyone knew it but know one would say it.  Needless to say the team change quarterbacks and the team moved on.  Until that point though the simmering resentment ruined the team until the change was made.  My point is the Dallas Cowboys needed Romo to do this.  In order for the team to continue with the season in a positive manner, the air had to be cleared.  Now Cowboys fans can relax and see if Dak Prescott is the future, which he appears to be.  If something happens to him you have a decent backup waiting named Tony Romo, class act.


Speaking of class acts, some chick is allegedly trying to extort money from Super Bowl MVP Von Miller,  over a (yawn) sex tape. How original.  I am sure TMZ has this story covered.

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Colin Kaepernick – role model

Colin Kaepernick is a role model?


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I can feel the quantum waves from the collective eye roll rippling through the dark matter of the universe.

Relax, I’m not going to try and convince you of this.  Nope.  As Anthony Kiedis so brilliantly put it in the  film Point Break:

“That would be a waste of time…”

Instead I’m going to introduce you to who Colin Kaepernick is as a man. At least as much as I could glean in 10 minutes reading his Wikipedia.

Now before I dive in, allow me to say this, I do not know Colin Kaepernick and I am not a 49’ers fan, although I do recognize the greatness of the Montana-Clark-Rice era.

That being said… I have zero stakes in the game. I actually didn’t pay any attention to this story when or since it broke. I didn’t even want to write this article, but a friend wanted my perspective, so I figured, you know, why the fuck not? I can be objective, especially since deep down, I could give a shit, let alone whose kneeling or standing and when.


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Let’s first look at what’s given about his childhood… according to Wikipedia, (take it with a grain of “fuck you.”)
Colin was born to Heidi (Zabranksy) Russo, a 19 year-old white girl who was single and destitute at the time, his birth father was an African American man who left the family before he was born.

Let that sink in for moment.

Shortly after Colin’s birth his mother puts him up for adoption. He’s adopted by Rick and Teresa Kaepernick, a white couple who already had two children of their own—son Kyle and daughter Devon—and were looking for a boy after having lost two other sons to heart defects. Colin became the youngest of their three children. He began playing football at 8 years old as a defensive end and punter. He became quarterback at age nine, and he completed his first competitive pass for a long touchdown. In school Colin thrived as well, a perfect 4.0 student that was nominated all state in baseball, basketball and football. Yes, he not only played all three sports but excelled in them. By his senior year he was throwing a 92 mph fastball and was being courted with scholarships from several big schools across the nation. However, Colin loved to play football, and although no scholarships were being offered, he was determined to follow his passion.

Another point you should let sink in.


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After his brother put together a highlight reel of his high school performances, Colin was given a scholarship to Nevada State where he would go on to be the first player in NCAA history to have over 2,000 yards passing and 1,000 yards rushing for three consecutive seasons. In, total he passed for over 10,000 yards and rushed for over 4,000 yards in a collegiate career.

On April 29, 2011,the San Francisco 49ers traded up with the Denver from the thirteenth pick in the second round (#45 overall) to select Kaepernick as the fourth pick in the second round (#36 overall).

After a lackluster season, most of it spent as a back up to Alex Smith, Kaepernick came back in 2012 and took the starting job in week 10 after Smith suffered a concussion. Kaepernick took the 49ers to the playoffs and logged his first post season win 45–31 against Green Bay and set an NFL single-game record for most rushing yards by a quarterback with 181, breaking Michael Vick’s record of 173 in a 2002 regular season game.


colin kaepernick super bowl xlvii


In the NFC Championship game, the 49ers defeated the Atlanta 28–24 with Kaepernick completing 16 out of 21 passes for 233 yards and one touchdown. The team advanced to Super Bowl XLVII in New Orleans against the Baltimore Ravens. Kaepernick threw for a touchdown and ran for another, but the 49ers fell behind early and could not come back, losing 31–34.

By pointing out his upbringing and accomplishments, I’m not asking you to forgive his transgression of kneeling during the national anthem, but instead drawing your attention to what’s important: Colin Kaepernick’s character as a man.

Colin Kaepernick is a hard worker, highly intelligent and self-motivated, even when things are not in his favor. Kaepernick could have easily turned to a life of crime, and who would have blamed him after his biological parents turned their backs on him.


Colin Kaepernick is a hard worker


He could have taken the easy route and relied on his arm in baseball, which offered scholarships at top schools that would have surely led to a multi-million dollar deal after a good season or two in college.

Instead, he chose his passion.

His first season and a half with the 49ers he did what was asked of him, often times coming in as a wildcat option. He was for all intents and purposes a team player.

When his moment came to step into the spotlight, he shined, and took advantage of the opportunity.

Once he rose to the top, and gained notoriety and a voice people would listen to… he turned his focus to social issue that directly effects him: the unfair treatment of blacks by law enforcement in America. Mind you, he had every reason to not do this, after his father, an African American man, walked out on him before he was even born. But Colin turned the other cheek and made his stand.


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Again I’m not arguing whether what he did was right, or wrong, I don’t give a shit. Even the greatest of men, occasional take the wrong stand.

What I am pointing out is that Colin Kaepernick embodies many of the qualities we ourselves instill in our own children: to work hard and never quit. To make the most of an opportunity when given it, to follow your passion, and to stand up for the oppressed and less fortunate, AND most importantly to do it non-violently. I cannot count how many times I see the talking heads chastising protestors for looting or becoming violent. And yet the amount of hate and vitriol aimed at Kaepernick for the simple act of refusing to stand for a song that represents a country run by a bunch of money grubbing criminals is astounding to me. He NEVER said shit about the troops.

The national anthem symbolizes this country, a country with a dark and checkered past when it comes to treatment of minorities.

I’m not asking you to agree with what Colin Kaepernick believes or what he did. What I am doing is asking you to do is to look at the man’s character, character that is exemplary of a role model.


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Again, you don’t have to like him, but just maybe if you can appreciate someone with good character standing up for something he feels passionate about, maybe you’ll be able to let go of the hate and criticism for a man that’s more than likely worked harder and overcome more than you ever will in your lifetime.

One final note, the very nature of protest more times than not is when an individual or group of individuals stand up to the status quo.

-The Notorious LL


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This is a guest post from The Notorious LL

(Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect the position of “The4519.com”. )


UPDATE:  Colin Kaepernick did not vote in the recent election.  Does this matter to you?

Does the NFL exploit the poor?

According to Bryant Gumbel, the NFL is exploiting the poor and it isn’t even a good product:

real sports on hbo, bryant gumbel, hbo brynat gumbel, nfl bryant gumbel

Malcolm Gladwell has written that within 25 years, it will be socially unacceptable to be a football player. I think that’s fast-forwarding the process. But I don’t dispute the idea that that’s what it’s going to come to. That’s what is to a certain extent already. It’s a game played by the poor for the benefit of the rich.

None of these prep schools have football teams. You look at where football flourishes. It flourishes in the poorest states. It flourishes in Mississippi, in Alabama, in West Virginia, Texas.

It’s because it’s an opportunity for people who don’t have education, or job opportunities, to make something of themselves, to get out. To a certain extent, it’s already close to being a game played by the poor for the benefit of the rich. They’re not giving away tickets to Giants stadium. You sit up in a luxury box the guys down there on the field don’t come from your background. I don’t know. Will we get there? I think we’ll get there. At what point, I don’t know. 

For all of its flaws—and there are a zillion of them—as an entertainment product on the television landscape, sports is still pretty good. I think the NFL probably is not a very good product now. But college football’s a pretty good product. I feel guilty watching it.


I read this from Bryant Gumbel this morning and wondered where the idea that the NFL exploits the poor and is a “not a very good product” came from?

If we are comparing the NFL to the S&P 500 I would say the NFL is an average product.  If I were to compare the NFL as a sports product, I would say it is the one of the best brands in the world.  Everyone has opinions about professional sports, good or bad.  Some people love to watch the game on Sunday, some people don’t.  That’s ok.  There are plenty of museums or movie theaters that get plenty of patrons regardless of what sports event is on at any given time.  If you aren’t into the NFL there is no one putting a gun to your head making you watch.

Bryant Gumbel on the today show

I get tired of people like Bryant Gumbel always bagging on the NFL.  When he says the NFL is a game that exploits the poor to benefit the rich, we know what he is talking about.  Gumbel ironically started out his career as a co-host of an NFL pregame show called “Grandstand” in 1975.  He co-hosted until 1982.  7 years covering the NFL…before it was the billion dollar monster it is now.  Hmm….seems to me like Bryant helped build the brand.  So if Bryant Gumbel has such a problem with the NFL exploiting the poor, why did he take jobs in the past to help promote the product?  Why did his brother, Greg Gumbel, host NFL Super Bowls and countless NFL games and television shows if the league is so exploitative?  I think the answer is simple: poor is code word for black.  Reading through some of Gumbel’s controversial comments over the years I see the evolution of a person who used the system to springboard his career to get where he wanted.  For all of its warts, I love the NFL.  I love the game, I love the fans, I love the players and the teams.  If someone feels the need to bash the sport, then go ahead.  You have the right to your opinions and there are plenty of other great sports out there.  To me,  it seems to make no difference that on Bryant Gumbel’s climb to the top he forgot where he started.  Ironically, he may have exploited the NFL to get him to where he is now, even if he is not poor (or black).

-the 4519