Category Archives: Fantasy Football

Several questions arise as NFL season gets under way

Specter of Sept. 11 anthem protests overshadows games

To football fans and Fantasy Football League players across the globe, the opening Sunday of the National Football League’s regular season is like Christmas morning.

And having the NFL’s opening weekend fall on the 15th anniversary of the horrifying 9/11 attacks on our country only serves to make today that much more special. After all, those attacks brought about a tremendous, renewed spirit of patriotism in our nation, and what could possibly be more of an American tradition than our own bruising brand of football?

Sure, the 2016 campaign actually opened Thursday night with the defending champion Denver Broncos again turning back the Carolina Panthers in a rematch of last February’s Super Bowl.

But that was just one game, sort of a tasty appetizer that helped whet our appetite for what takes place today, when we get the full-meal-deal, a tantalizing smorgasbord of 13 games that will help usher in another edition of our country’s most popular sport.

And as the NFL season gets underway, there are some questions that will be answered in the weeks ahead as players and teams try to navigate the always difficult path to the playoffs and, eventually, the Super Bowl.

Questions like:

• Who are all these new starting quarterbacks? And will any of them be able to play up to expectations?

In Denver, Trevor Siemian took over for retired legend Peyton Manning and, with virtually zero previous experience in a regular-season game, all he did in his debut is help lead the Broncos to a come-from-behind victory over the Panthers in Thursday’s season-opener.

Rookie QB Dak Prescott takes the reins in Dallas in the wake of veteran Tony Romo’s latest injury. Another rookie, Carson Wentz, has been handed the car keys in Philadelphia, which prompted the Eagles to ship veteran Sam Bradford off to Minnesota.

Brock Osweiler, who started several games in Manning’s absence last season in Denver, is now the new QB in Houston. And another highly touted rookie, Jared Goff, could wind up being the first-stringer for the Rams, who have returned to Los Angeles after relocating in St. Louis for the last couple of decades.

 

Source: www.deseretnews.com

NFL star Benjamin Watson takes on Planned Parenthood

NFL star says ‘whole idea’ of Planned Parenthood is to ‘exterminate blacks’

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  • Benjamin Watson made the remarks in an interview with a pro-life group
  • He justified the comment by suggesting Margaret Sanger was racist
  • Sanger founded what would become Planned Parenthood in October 1916
  • ‘The whole idea… in the past was to exterminate blacks,’ Watson said

Christian NFL player Ben Watson does not hesitate to call out Planned Parenthood’s targeting of minority women and their babies for abortions.

In a recent interview with Turning Point Pregnancy Resource Center in San Diego, the Baltimore Ravens player talked about the racial divide in America and how it factors into the abortion issue.

“… Abortion saddens me period, but it seems to be something that is really pushed on minorities and provided to minorities especially as something that they should do,” Watson said.

He pointed to Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger and her eugenic push to exterminate people she deemed “unfit.” Today, “it’s working,” Watson said.

“We sit here and talk about advancing the black agenda, whatever that means, we talk about our interests, and what’s important to us – like having political power and advancement and all those things – and then we are turning around and we are killing our children,” Watson continued. “And we are buying the lie that it’s our personal decision to make.”

The NFL star said he is sympathetic to the women who are struggling with an unplanned pregnancy. But Watson, a husband and father of five children, said many men are not stepping up to help their children and the women in their lives like they should. He urged men to take responsibility for their actions.

“He need to be there to support her through the physical changes of the pregnancy, and help and provide emotional strength, and do it together,” Watson continued. “As much as he has a role in making the baby in the first place, it needs to take both of them the whole way through.”

Sometimes, Watson said he does have the opportunity to talk with other NFL players about abortion and his pro-life convictions. Just like in almost any career setting, Watson said they talk about many different things, including politics and religion.

“You’ve got guys that consider themselves Conservative and pro-life, and you’ve got guys that consider themselves Liberal and pro-choice, and it kind of goes back and forth,” he said. “What I love is that in most of the situations I have been in, not all of them, but most, even if we sometimes talk abrasively to each other, we still have love for each other.”

Last year, after the Center for Medical Progress began releasing its undercover Planned Parenthood videos, Watson wasn’t shy about speaking up for unborn babies either.


He posted on his Facebook wall:

As horrific as it is, the issue isn’t really the sale of human parts. It’s the legal practice that allows this to even be a possibility. Killing children and simply discarding the leftovers is not any more acceptable than profiting off of them. #PlannedParenthood


Asked if he has faced backlash for his stance, Watson told Turning Point, “I won’t say I’m not afraid, and I will say that I’ve received some flak for some of the things I’ve said … I decided that you know, if the spirit of God has prompted me to say something, I’m going to trust in God and say it.”

I have to give mad respect to Ben Watson.  No matter what your position on Planned Parenthood, it takes some cajones to speak up like he has.  With the digital world we live in now the backlash will be inevitable.

Sourced here and here

Every State’s Best Homegrown Running Back

Which state can lay claim to the best running back in football history? PointAfter has found the answer.

Source: football-players.pointafter.com

Similar to legendary quarterbacks, plenty of running backs are strongly associated with their home states. Marcus Allen grew up in San Diego, starred in college at USC and won a Super Bowl with the Los Angeles Raiders. And before he won a Super Bowl with the Dallas Cowboys, Tony Dorsett attended high school in Aliquippa, Penn., and won the Heisman Trophy while playing for Pittsburgh.

Here’s why an NFL player is suing FanDuel, Ironically

pierre garcon, redskins, washington redskins, fanduel, fantasy football, nfl, draft kings
Washington Redskins wide receiver Pierre Garcon looks on late in the fourth quarter in a game between the Redskins and New York Giants at MetLife Stadium on December 14, 2014 in East Rutherford, NJ. Photograph by Ricky Carioti — The Washington Post/Getty Images

It’s not about gambling.

Amidst ongoing scrutiny of daily fantasy sports companies, Washington Redskins wide receiver Pierre Garçon, through his attorney, filed a class action lawsuit against FanDuel on Friday.

There has been a slew of class action lawsuits brought against FanDuel and its competitor DraftKings in the past few weeks, but they have been brought by users of the companies alleging unfair play by insiders. The lawsuits came in the wake of a major scandal over a DraftKings employee who won $250,000 playing on FanDuel.

But Garçon’s lawsuit is different. It’s not about insider play, nor is it concerned with whether daily fantasy sports is gambling, which has been the focus of recent regulatory scrutiny. It’s about player permission, and whether FanDuel illegally uses player names and likenesses. He has filed it “on behalf” of all NFL players, but for now the suit is coming only from Garçon.

According to a statement released by Garçon’s lawyers, the receiver argues that FanDuel, “knowingly and improperly exploits the popularity and performance of Garçon, along with all the other National Football League (“NFL”) players at offensive skilled positions without their authority or a valid license.”

The complaint also addresses FanDuel’s advertising: “Through a comprehensive television advertising campaign… FanDuel routinely uses the names and likenesses of some of these NFL players without authorization to promote FanDuel’s commercial enterprise.”

In other words, the lawsuit addresses two different realms: the product itself (FanDuel’s website and app, where it uses player names and a small photo of each) and the company’s ads. To the former complaint, there is some legal precedent that favors FanDuel, though it was in a different sport: in 2006 a federal judge ruled that fantasy sports leagues can use the names and likenesses of MLB players. The latter may be the stronger argument for Garçon: Last month, DraftKings scored a deal with the NFL Players’ Association that allows the company to use any NFL players in its advertisements with or without the player’s individual permission; this is why DraftKings isn’t part of Garçon’s lawsuit.

FanDuel has no such deal. It has not used Garçon’s face in its advertisements (in fact FanDuel has sought to differentiate its advertising from DraftKings by utilizing regular people, not celebrity spokespeople), but it has shown screens with his name listed among other players.

“I am bringing this lawsuit against FanDuel for using my name, image, and likeness in both daily fantasy contests and through advertising on TV ads and infomercials,” Garçon said in a statement. But as Twitter users were quick to point out on Friday, the suit represents a change of heart by the receiver, who repeatedly shilled for FanDuel in the past, up until one year ago.

It’s not about gambling.

Amidst ongoing scrutiny of daily fantasy sports companies, Washington Redskins wide receiver Pierre Garçon, through his attorney, filed a class action lawsuit against FanDuel on Friday.

There has been a slew of class action lawsuits brought against FanDuel and its competitor DraftKings in the past few weeks, but they have been brought by users of the companies alleging unfair play by insiders. The lawsuits came in the wake of a major scandal over a DraftKings employee who won $250,000 playing on FanDuel.

But Garçon’s lawsuit is different. It’s not about insider play, nor is it concerned with whether daily fantasy sports is gambling, which has been the focus of recent regulatory scrutiny. It’s about player permission, and whether FanDuel illegally uses player names and likenesses. He has filed it “on behalf” of all NFL players, but for now the suit is coming only from Garçon.

According to a statement released by Garçon’s lawyers, the receiver argues that FanDuel, “knowingly and improperly exploits the popularity and performance of Garçon, along with all the other National Football League (“NFL”) players at offensive skilled positions without their authority or a valid license.”

The complaint also addresses FanDuel’s advertising: “Through a comprehensive television advertising campaign… FanDuel routinely uses the names and likenesses of some of these NFL players without authorization to promote FanDuel’s commercial enterprise.”

In other words, the lawsuit addresses two different realms: the product itself (FanDuel’s website and app, where it uses player names and a small photo of each) and the company’s ads. To the former complaint, there is some legal precedent that favors FanDuel, though it was in a different sport: in 2006 a federal judge ruled that fantasy sports leagues can use the names and likenesses of MLB players. The latter may be the stronger argument for Garçon: Last month, DraftKings scored a deal with the NFL Players’ Association that allows the company to use any NFL players in its advertisements with or without the player’s individual permission; this is why DraftKings isn’t part of Garçon’s lawsuit.

FanDuel has no such deal. It has not used Garçon’s face in its advertisements (in fact FanDuel has sought to differentiate its advertising from DraftKings by utilizing regular people, not celebrity spokespeople), but it has shown screens with his name listed among other players.

“I am bringing this lawsuit against FanDuel for using my name, image, and likeness in both daily fantasy contests and through advertising on TV ads and infomercials,” Garçon said in a statement. But as Twitter users were quick to point out on Friday, the suit represents a change of heart by the receiver, who repeatedly shilled for FanDuel in the past, up until one year ago.

This lawsuit has a lot in common with UCLA basketball alum Ed O’Bannon’s much-publicized class action lawsuit against the NCAA over compensation for college athletes. When O’Bannon first filed in 2009, his claim named EA Games as a co-defendant, for using player likenesses without consent. He was successful in that part of his suit; in 2014 the video game company settled for $40 million.

Source here